Craft meadery catches the eye of a Taupō man who bets the farm on the venture

Mead maker Jay Bennett literally sold the farm to pursue his passion for strawberries, but the Taupō-based brewer has hit the sweet spot, winning multiple awards for his work.

Although relationship breakdowns may have forced his hand and Covid-19 lockdowns have hindered commercial success, Bennett’s Beehave! The Craft Meadery has finally opened its doors to the public.

Owner, operator, beekeeper and brewer Bennett, a former rafting guide, moved to town two years ago after selling the small farm he had lived on at the southern end of Lake Taupō since the mid-1980s.

Since then, he has been brewing tea commercially from his beehive base on Spa Rd and has a small team of two part-timers and one full-timer to help carry the load.

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He said the New Zealand mead scene was still in its infancy, he felt like a pioneer.

“You’ll find that a lot of people try mead but don’t get much out of it. A lot of it is really sweet.

“But now we get great feedback wherever we go, with about an 85% hit rate from taste to purchase.

“I think people are surprised at how good it tastes.”

Mead is the oldest fermented alcoholic product on earth, dating back 12,000 years to when pre-agricultural humans deliberately stomped on wild bee hives and drank the sweet honey-scented water.

Take the bee!  The Meadery's tasting room and brewery also offer brewery tours and free tasting sessions.

Supply/Waikato Times

Take the bee! The Meadery’s tasting room and brewery also offer brewery tours and free tasting sessions.

As with the lawn, Bennett said he got into beekeeping by accident after discovering and removing a beehive on his property.

Years later, after running up to 200 hives, he decided that beekeeping was too much of a chore to make a small profit, and used beekeeping as another way to use up the final product.

“The bees took me to drink,” he said.

“I’m no longer a beekeeper but I still use my own honey and how long that lasts will depend on how busy we are, but next April I’ll be looking for other supplies.

“We want to use the best ingredients we can find because that really makes a difference.

“Everything has to be fresh, otherwise it affects the final product.”

Bennett got most of his ingredients from friends, including limes, lemons, berries, hops and peppers, and mixed them with special honeys to make his range.

Bennett uses his skills as a beekeeper to create his award-winning meads.

Supply/Waikato Times

Bennett uses his skills as a beekeeper to create his award-winning meads.

“My whole job is to look at the flavor I want to create and work from there on the honey and yeast — and different honeys make all the difference in flavor.”

He said the infused mead was designed to appeal to beer drinkers and was very successful.

At the 2022 New Zealand Fruit Wine and Cider Awards, Bennett’s entries won gold or silver awards and his Fever Dream chocolate and chilli liqueur won best overall mead.

“I’m all self-taught and it’s trial and error, my first tea was feijoa mead, but I had no idea about yeast control and it came out at 18%.”

A brew can last anywhere from weeks to months depending on what strength and carbonation is required – from zero to about 12% ABV.

Everything from heating, fermenting, straining, pressing, carbonating, bottling and packing the honey is done in house.

Take the bee!  The Meadery on Spa Rd in Taupō has only been open to the public for six weeks.

Supply/Waikato Times

Take the bee! The Meadery on Spa Rd in Taupō has only been open to the public for six weeks.

After going straight to commercial production in March 2020, Bennett wants to get out there to promote his products – he says getting in front of people at events is key to his success.

“It’s one of those things, you don’t know how good you are until you try.”

As with the craft beer industry, there are many brewers willing to help, Bennett said.

“Oats may not seem easy to make, but the better oat flours out there make it easier for all of us.

“Now all we need is for people to get on board and start consuming the product.

“Come and try what you’re missing out on, most people are pleasantly surprised – I sold the farm to do what I do – literally.”

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