Local News: Patrol dog: Sheriff’s Department adds K9 officer (11/9/22)

Fenrir is one of the newest members of the New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department. The recently turned 2-year-old dog is being trained to detect and track narcotics.

Jill Bock/Standard Democrat

NEW MADRID, Mo. – A black Belgian Malinois sits at Elizabeth’s feet. When the 3-year-old sighs, the dog looks at him intently and rubs his leg.

Then Deputy Tim Hise of the New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department calls the dog. As soon as the harness and collar snap into place, Fenrir knows it’s time to go to work.

For the past six months, Hise and Fenrir have worked as a team at the Sheriff’s Department.

As a reward for a job well done, Fenrir plays with his ball. The New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department recently purchased the dog from a trainer at no charge.

Jill Bock/Standard Democrat

Hise, who was hired by Sheriff Bud Cooper in December 2020, said that while working the night shift, he and his partner discussed ideas about how they could be more proactive in their work. Knowing the department’s K9 handler was leaving, Hise said they considered applying for a grant to fund a new drug and tracking dog for the county.

The Sheriff liked the idea, and after doing more research, Hise learned that the Department could adopt a dog for free through Dowdy Dogs with Brian Dowdy.

According to Hisa, after meeting Dowdy, he went to kennels to choose a dog. Fenrir was the second dog he met.

Tim Hise rubs Fenrir’s belly after the dog checked the lockers at Risko High School recently. According to Hise, the dog is very friendly unless otherwise ordered.

Jill Bock/Standard Democrat

Dowdy described the dog as one of his favorites and gave Hisa a ball.

“The first time I threw the ball, the dog looked at me, and he looked at the ball and waited for it to land and disappear into the tall grass, then took off after it. As soon as he returned with her, he rolled over on his stomach and wanted to be praised. I started petting him and he started licking my face,” Hise recalled. “I really felt a strong connection with him.”

The name Fenrir comes from Norse mythology.

New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Tim Hise and Fenrir work together at Risco High School. School officials asked the group to come to the school to search for drugs.

Jill Bock/Standard Democrat

“Fenrir is the wolf son of Loki, this big black wolf and he is very scary,” Hise said. “When I first saw him, he looked like a wolf and I connected with him. When I first called him Fenrir, it was like we were on a first name basis.”

They trained together for two months.

The training began with Fenrir learning to detect drugs. The dog quickly learned to sniff out methamphetamine, Ecstasy and Xanax.

New Madrid County Sheriff’s Department Deputy Tim Hise and Fenrir work together at Risco High School. School officials asked the group to come to the school to search for drugs.

Jill Bock/Standard Democrat

As the training progressed, Hise and Fenrir spent the mornings detecting the drug. The afternoon included searching for lost articles, tracking and fear.

“You train them for practically no failure. So you never guess the dog when we go out. It’s impressive,” Hise said.

At the beginning of this year, Fenrir joined Hiseye patrol.

The dog has already helped track down suspects in New Madrid County and neighboring counties, Hise said.

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