See how NJ Farm Offers Sausage is made… and pulled pork and even a stick

A quote attributed to Otto von Bismarck says: “If you like laws and sausages, you should never watch them being made.”

With all the political drama of the recent midterm elections fresh in one’s mind, it seems an unfair association for sausage — at least for the sausage made Saturday at Howell Living History Farm’s Bacon, Sausage & Scrapple Making.

The working farm is also a museum showing what life was like in 1900.

For the past 38 years, ED Lapp Farm on Pequea Creek in Lancaster (with a 107-year-old pedigree) has been coming to Howell Farm to show how sausages, pork chops and even hot dogs are made. to break

We’re a family farm,” said patriarch Alvin Lapp as he wielded a knife to butcher a pig. “My father (Elmer Lapp, now deceased) was actually involved with Pete (Watson, the farm’s director) and Howell Farms… And I was about one thing and another. thing, and Pete got my dad to come down and do this show, and it’s been going on every year.

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Howell Living History Farm cooks bacon and sausage during Bacon, Sausage and Scrapple Cooking Saturday.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Howell Living History Farm Historic Interpreter and Farmer Alessandra Thomas cooks bacon and sausage for visitors during Saturday’s Bacon, Sausage and Scrapple Making program. In the pan on the right is a tortilla made from the farm’s corn.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

When it comes to how the sausage is made, a hard-working farm family literally and figuratively puts their heart into their sausage, and it’s not complicated.

“We put the heart in the sausage and then the sausage is whatever flavored ground pork you want,” said Jennifer Faus, Elmer Lapp’s daughter.

“Our usual recipe is salt, pepper and brown sugar, and that’s it. Then you can empty it with meatballs or we put it in natural containers.”

When it comes to how to make burt scraps, the process is complicated.

Scrapple originated in Germany and was brought to America by Pennsylvania Dutch settlers in the 17th century.

“I think he has an unfortunate name,” Faus said. “It’s just scraps, that’s all, but (at least for them) it’s not like a nose or a tail or anything crazy.”

He describes the start of the shredding process as a “pork soup” involving the skinned liver and kidneys of the pig.

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Pork chowder is cooked over an open fire at Howell Living History Farm during the Soup Starter, Pork, Sausage and Scrapple Making program.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

“Everything is cooked, we take everything out, we separate all the meat from the bones. It is driven to the mill, not the bones, but all the products we choose and all the cooked organs go through the mill.”

The result of this process is called “puddins”, which are then put back into the pork broth with salt and pepper, cornmeal and flour added to the desired consistency.

“It will actually roll off the sides of the pot. That way you know it’s thick enough and we put it in baking pans, you can put it in cake pans,” Faus said.

So by the time the consumer gets it home and puts it on the breakfast plate, Faus says, it’s already been cooked twice. It can be eaten cold, but most grits lovers enjoy the charred brown edges when grilled.

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Visitors to the Howell Living History Farm see how sausages, pork chops and sticks are made. Family farmers from left are Patriarch Elvin Lapp, Cole Faus, Jennifer Faus, Michael Hershey, Paige Faus, Mason Goodhart , 6, and Janelle Goodhart.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, Nov. 12, 2022 – Brothers Gabriel and Samuel Mancuso, ages 3 and 6, of Yardley, watch Farmer Elmer Lapp carve a pig as they learn how to make bacon, sausage and sticks at the Howell Living History Farm program. .Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Jason Mancuso of Yardley, Pa., brought his family to the event. His two sons, Gabriel, 3, and Samuel, 6, watched Elvin Lapp butcher the 250-pound pig.

Mancuso said his family started visiting Howell Farm this year.

“You know, it’s nice to show the kids and learn a little bit about how things are actually done and how things were done in the old days.

“Food magically appears because you don’t go to the fridge, to the supermarket.”

Howell Farms programs are comprehensive and cover a wide range of topics including beekeeping, plowing, planting and sheep shearing.

“We want to represent the foodways and farming methods of this particular region,” said director Pete Watson, speaking about the production of bacon, sausages and sausages on Saturday.

Scroll for more photos:

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Visitors to the Howell Living History Farm see how sausages, pork chops and sticks are made. Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Visitors to the Howell Living History Farm see how sausages, pork chops and sticks are made. Family farmers from left are Patriarch Elvin Lapp, Cole Faus, Jennifer Faus, Michael Hershey, Paige Faus, Mason Goodhart , 6, and Janelle Goodhart.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Matthew West Jr., 2 1/2, of Newtown, Pa. Howell gets help popping corn from his father, Matthew, at the Living History Farm. Historical Interpreter Gail Trautz is at right.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Visitors to the Howell Living History Farm see how sausages, pork chops and sticks are made. Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Sausage preparation

Saturday, November 12, 2022 – Farmer Elvin Lapp carves a pig at Howell Living History Farm during the Bacon, Sausage and Scrapple Making program.Michael Mancuso | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Please subscribe now and support local journalism you trust and rely on.

You can contact Michael Mancuso mmancuso@njadvancemedia.com

Leave a Comment